360° Street View

HoP Projects CT20 Is an InnovatIve vIsual arts and cultural platform from the margins. It’s designed to promote a pluralistic and intuitive understanding of contemporary culture - transcending established disciplines and genres, responding to rapid social and cultural shifts, and incorporating the unexpected to create new perspectives.

Folkestone Triennial

Sol Calero’s practice refers to Latino culture and its exchange of influence with Western European traditions, revolving around the notions of ancestry, culture, and the transformation of meaning that visual symbols can undergo in society.  She is interested in reflecting the ambiguity of cultural signs, and investigating the way in which meanings can proliferate and change.

Folkestone Triennial

Varga Weisz’s five-headed sculpture Rug People, its body wrapped in blankets and cardboard, appears stranded and forlorn. Arrived as if by magic, the group huddles together on the disused railway tracks of the old Harbour Station. The Station, with its history of bringing First World War soldiers to the harbour to embark to France, as well as being the terminus for the Orient Express until 2008, provided the major inspiration for Varga Weisz’s work.

360° interior and exterior view linked on google

D:NA is the home of performance artist Ernst Fischer, and a semi-public performance, meeting and research space located in a small, rented flat in South London. In keeping with its own insignificance and in reflection of its full title, the Archive is (and shall be) the home of small things: beautiful and insignificant, profound and negligible, harmless and useful, as well as harmful and useless, objects, actions and substances, including documentation of the work of LEIBNIZ, a performance art collective, of which Ernst is the artistic director.

Folkestone Triennial

Folkestone Triennial

Jonathan Wright works with images, materials and structures derived from the fabric of modernity. But since he is also fascinated by craft techniques, his compositions using this modernist vocabulary often become mysterious and seemingly functionless through the intervention of personal and felt elements, in a personalised and romantic critique of the modernist project.